Here is a collection of our most frequently asked questions and the answers to give you more informed decision making powers.

Speed of Light Fibre

Fibre-optic communication is a method of transmitting information from one place to another by sending pulses of light through an optical fiber. The light forms an electromagnetic carrier wave that is modulated to carry information. Fiber is preferred over electrical cabling when high bandwidth, long distance, or immunity to electromagnetic interference are required. This type of communication can transmit voice, video, and telemetry through local area networks, computer networks, or across long distances.

Optical fiber is used by many telecommunications companies to transmit telephone signals, Internet communication, and cable television signals. Researchers at Bell Labs have reached internet speeds of over 100 petabit×kilometer per second using fiber-optic communication.

Yes. ICASA requires you to have the necessary licenses in order to provision and operate a Fibre network.

More information on the Licensing in South Africa can be found here.

In addition to providing the fastest-possible internet connection, fibre internet has several other advantages over cable and DSL.

Fibre-optic lines are better for carrying information over long distances.
Even light and electricity are negatively affected by long-distance travel. Signal strength degrades the farther it has to travel, which can result in a weak signal or lower bandwidth. Copper cable links are limited to a distance of 328 feet to maintain signal strength. Fibre-optic cables can run up to almost 25 miles, which gives them better signal strength for less cable.

Fibre-optic lines are not affected by electrical or radio interference.
Although copper is a great medium for conducting electricity, it is not a closed system, which means electromagnetic or radio interference can negatively affect it. High levels of interference will reduce signal strength and risk cutting the signal entirely. Glass and plastic fibre optic lines are more insulated against outside interference, making their signal much more secure.

Fibre optic lines are less prone to damage and wear and tear.
Copper is a soft metal and conducts heat, which means that older systems are prone to damage from the environment (including impacts or fire hazards) and will break down over time. Fibre lines, despite their extremely small size, are much harder and more resistant. While copper can withstand around 25 pounds of pressure before being damaged, fibre lines can take between 100 to 200 pounds of pressure.

If you consider the importance of speed, efficiency, and reliability when transmitting data, then your best choice is fibre internet for downloading and uploading your information.

Getting connected to fibre if it is already available in your area is a fairly quick process. Based on our experience, this can take anything from 4 weeks up to 6 months – if even feasible by the provider.

SPOC Managed Services can order a line from numerous Fibre suppliers depending on your suburb, who then lays fibre outside the property boundary wall. The fibre line supplier then needs to run fibre from your boundary wall to inside your office and connect it to a Customer Premises Equipment (CPE) device. The make /model of the CPE device is supplier dependent. SPOC will then install a WAN enabled wireless router to get you connected to speed of light internet.

Gone are the days of having to rent your line and have a landline number in order to connect to the internet. Fibre is completely independent from old analogue/copper technology. This cuts down drastically on your monthly costs.

We will supply the correct modem/router hardware in order to connect your business to the internet. The modem/router will be appropriate to your business needs and internet connectivity requirements.

Yes, you can with the appropriate telecom hardware and software. This provides superior call quality and cuts down on your call costs by 30%. Contact our Business Consultants for a free consultation about our telecom hardware and software.

Kindly contact us via the options below:
Head office (Gauteng)
Telephone: 012 643 9940

Email: sales@spocsa.co.za

Cape Town Branch
Telephone: 021 915 5600

 

Fibre is available Countrywide. SPOC managed Services (PTY) Ltd. can assist in determining whether fibre is a viable option for your business:

Kindly contact us via the options below:
Head office (Gauteng)
Telephone: 012 643 9940

Email: sales@spocsa.co.za

Cape Town Branch
Telephone: 021 915 5600

We will gladly assist you in determining your fibre coverage availability. In instances where fibre is not yet available in your area, alternate solutions are available. Kindly contact us and we will gladly assist you in getting online.

Before you test just how fast your network connection is, remember that you are limited by the package by which you have purchased. Even if the equipment is capable of carrying higher speeds, you may be limited by the service you have subscribed to and may be subject to certain throttling or contention ratios.

Fibre systems can be designed to provide “5 nines” availability. Anything that blocks the transmission path for a substantial length of time will affect performance. Properly designed systems are virtually unaffected by weather.

Design engineering includes an availability statistic which states a given percentage uptime. Design goals are so-called “5 nines” or 99.999% availability which translates into a few minutes annually.

Definitely! The degree of latency is very low since Fibre transmission travels at lightspeed, which makes this a perfect transmission for Voice communication.

It depends on what you’re sending and the system that you use. When it comes to IP, if the information may be encrypted before it is transmitted, then depending on the type of transmission, it can be very secure.

In some cases, the equipment you use can detect an attempt from a hacker and take appropriate action. In other cases, specific matches between transmitting data and receiving data are part of a design, so unless there is an exact match, hacking of data becomes impossible.

When a user is connected to the Internet using broadband technology they are sharing the connection infrastructure with other users.

The term contention is simply a ratio used to measure the extent of this sharing. The typical contention ratio for standard Fibre services is 10:1.

For example, on a package with the contention of 10:1, up to 10 other Broadband users may share the bandwidth in the same connection point.

Network operators can provide varying contention ratios since they own and operate their network, and upgrading capacity on a sector to maintain a guaranteed contention ratio is relatively simple which enables the provider to guarantee its services levels

Go Wireless

Yes. ICASA requires you to have the necessary licenses in order to provision and operate a Wireless network.

More information on the Licensing in South Africa can be found here.

Before you test just how fast your network connection is, remember that you are limited by the package by which you have purchased. Even if the equipment is capable of carrying higher speeds, you may be limited by the service you have subscribed to and may be subject to certain throttling or contention ratios.

A clear line of sight (LOS) is one of the most important conditions for creating reliable wireless links. All wireless signals are attenuated when they encounter obstructions. The goal for every network designer is to reduce the amount of attenuation by deploying clear LOS links.

Despite what the term LoS implies-the ability to see from point A to point B without any obstructions, wireless line-of-sight requires more than being able to easily see from one location to another.

Wireless signals travel in waves, not straight lines, which mean that the signal is radiated outwards from the antenna-not linearly.

Yes, there are a few options available. We look forward to consulting with you on the various options available to you regarding your wireless connectivity.

Kindly contact our Business Consultant department via the options below:
Head office (Gauteng)
Telephone: 012 643 9940

Email: sales@spocsa.co.za

Cape Town Branch
Telephone: 021 915 5600

 

Wireless Connectivity can be designed to provide “5 nines” availability. Anything that blocks the transmission path for a substantial length of time will affect performance. Properly designed systems are virtually unaffected by rain, snow or fog.

Design engineering includes an availability statistic which states a given percentage uptime. Design goals are so-called “5 nines” or 99.999% availability which translates into a few minutes annually. Other than the effects of atmospheric conditions, the only other variable is the equipment itself, which is no different than any other electronic device.

You can use wireless connectivity for Voice and Data

The degree of latency is very low since microwaves travel near light speed. Consider a microwave path as just another piece of plumbing, except that instead of water, you’re delivering bits of information.

It depends on what you’re sending and the system that you use. When it comes to IP, if the information may be encrypted before it is transmitted, then depending on the type of transmission, it can be very secure.

In some cases, the equipment you use can detect an attempt from a hacker and take appropriate action. In other cases, specific matches between transmitting data and receiving data are part of a design, so unless there is an exact match, hacking of data becomes impossible.

ICASA regulates all radio transmission, whether licensed or non-licensed. They have, however, set aside certain frequencies for non-licensed situations.

You can install a system without the time and expense involved in getting a license. The problem with non-licensed technology is that ANYONE can put up a system that might interfere with another system. Therefore, if you have interference you cannot arbitrate or eliminate the problem, as there is no recourse which can be taken.

Like any wireless signal, changes to the environment can cause interference, however, only severe rain could affect your service.

There are known issues with interference, including (but not limited to) amateur radios, existing microwave towers or antennas, and other 2.4 or 5.8 GHz wireless devices.

If you have a 2.4 GHz cordless phone, you will need to locate it at least 3m away from your computer, antenna cable, and/or antenna.

SPOC Managed Services will install a Radio outside the business that will connect to the Network which connects all of your devices.

This will require a small hole to be drilled through your exterior wall. An ethernet cable will then be connected from the outside to one jack on that radio, and the other jack will have an ethernet connection to the network switch.

The actual implementation and activation can happen in a single day due to wireless technology not being dependent on, or limited by, Fixed-line infrastructure. Wireless connectivity is a quick method to get online.

No, the transmission of data differs between the two connectivity methods. Fixed wireless is much faster and more reliable due to its design.

Terrestrial (land-based) fixed wireless networks are made up of access points located on building rooftops and towers across the area. Subscribers must have a line of sight to these towers. Fixed wireless is a low latency service not impacted by weather conditions, unlike satellite services which may deliver high latency and poor performance.

When a user is connected to the Internet using broadband technology they are sharing the connection infrastructure with other users.

The term contention is simply a ratio used to measure the extent of this sharing. The typical contention ratio for standard Wireless services is 10:1.

For example, on a package with the contention of 10:1, up to 10 other Broadband users may share the bandwidth in the same connection point.

Network operators can provide varying contention ratios since they own and operate our their network, and upgrading capacity on a sector to maintain a guaranteed contention ratio is relatively simple which enables SPOC Managed Services to guarantee our services levels.

All About Voice

Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), also called IP telephony, is a method and group of technologies for the delivery of voice communications and multimedia sessions over Internet Protocol (IP) networks, such as the Internet. The terms Internet telephony, broadband telephony, and broadband phone service specifically refer to the provisioning of communications services (voice, fax, SMS, voice-messaging) over the public Internet, rather than via the public switched telephone network (PSTN), also known as plain old telephone service (POTS).

The steps and principles involved in originating VoIP telephone calls are similar to traditional digital telephony and involve signaling, channel setup, digitization of the analog voice signals, and encoding. Instead of being transmitted over a circuit-switched network, the digital information is packetized and transmission occurs as IP packets over a packet-switched network. They transport media streams using special media delivery protocols that encode audio and video with audio codecs and video codecs. Various codecs exist that optimize the media stream based on application requirements and network bandwidth; some implementations rely on narrowband and compressed speech, while others support high-fidelity stereo codecs.

The most widely speech coding standards in VoIP are based on the linear predictive coding (LPC) and modified discrete cosine transform (MDCT) compression methods. Popular codecs include the MDCT-based AAC-LD (used in FaceTime), the LPC/MDCT-based Opus (used in WhatsApp), the LPC-based SILK (used in Skype), μ-law and A-law versions of G.711, G.722, and an open source voice codec known as iLBC, a codec that uses only 8 kbit/s each way called G.729.

Early providers of voice-over-IP services offered business models and technical solutions that mirrored the architecture of the legacy telephone network. Second-generation providers, such as Skype, built closed networks for private user bases, offering the benefit of free calls and convenience while potentially charging for access to other communication networks, such as the PSTN. This limited the freedom of users to mix-and-match third-party hardware and software. Third-generation providers, such as Google Talk, adopted the concept of federated VoIP—which is a departure from the architecture of the legacy networks. These solutions typically allow dynamic interconnection between users on any two domains on the Internet when a user wishes to place a call.

In addition to VoIP phones, VoIP is also available on many personal computers and other Internet access devices. Calls and SMS text messages may be sent over mobile data or Wi-Fi. VoIP allows modern communications technologies (including telephones, smartphones, voice and video conferencing, email, and presence detection) to be consolidated using a single unified communications system.

To be able to place or receive calls using VoIP, you need a hardware setup that will allow you to speak and listen. You might simply need a headset with your PC or a complete set of network equipment including routers and phone adapters.

You will require various equipment such as:

For each line, you may need 30kbps upload and download bandwidth dependent on the Compression Codec. Be aware that in South Africa, some Broadband may be Asymmetric; meaning that the upload and download speed isn’t the same. A good example would be a Telkom 4Mbps ADSL where the download speed is 4Mbps, however, the upload speed remains capped at 512kbps.

If you already had one VoIP line and wanted to add another two, you should accommodate for an extra 60kbps of your upload and download speed, so a total of 90kbps of upload and download capacity is required.

Whenever Voice is going to be shared with PC’s or any other device on the network that will be using Internet Bandwidth, it is always important to set Quality of Service (QoS) which will ensure that Voice is given Priority over Data. You will also need an available Ethernet RJ-45 port to connect the VoIP device.

Bandwidth costs need to be taken into account when implementing VoIP services as VoIP uses data bandwidth just as surfing the Internet or receiving emails.

Most VoIP providers work with G.729 Codec which consumes 30 kilobytes per second of upload and download data. At 30kbps per call, data usage per 60 minutes of voice conversation amounts to 13.5Mb. One month usage at 60 minutes per day will work out to 297Mb per month, or 1Gb of data will give you 74 hours of Talktime. Make sure that you accommodate for this in your Internet plan.

It is always recommended to have a line dedicated for Voice Connectivity unless our business consultants can guarantee optimal voice quality on a shared line. This guarantee is dependent on signal quality and various other technical requirements being met.

If a new line needs to be ordered, usually this process is expedited by converting an existing Fax Line to ADSL. However, with ADSL viewing end of life in less than 5 years, taking the extra time to convert to more modern internet connections is the best option for your future communications. 

With Number Portability, you have the option to port your existing Telkom numbers to SPOC Managed Services – meaning that you keep your Telkom number but replace their service for VoIP.

Yes, you are more than welcome to utilize our services on existing company infrastructure. As long as your PABX has incoming line trunk ports, or supports SIP Trunking (is VoIP enabled). It doesn’t even matter what ports these areas there are so many VoIP Gateways to ‘VoIP enable’ Legacy PABX’s. However, be aware that your VoIP service may not be able to offer Faxing or connectivity of Point of Sale, Merchant Station, or Alarm systems.

We provide free consultation regarding your office infrastructure.

Kindly contact our Business Consultant department via the options below:
Head office (Gauteng)
Telephone: 012 643 9940

Email: sales@spocsa.co.za

Cape Town Branch
Telephone: 021 915 5600

 

If you are using the same connection for both your Data and VoIP, then your VoIP connection will unfortunately be affected.

Kindly contact us for a consultation regarding your infrastructure and the necessary steps we can take to assist you in getting back online.
Head office (Gauteng) HelpDesk
Telephone: 086 111 2802

Email: helpdesk@spocsa.co.za

Cape Town Branch
Telephone: 086 110 6012

Depending on your setup and permission structure you can dial international numbers. However, if you experience errors kindly contact our HelpDesk to check your permissions:

Head office (Gauteng) HelpDesk
Telephone: 086 111 2802

Email: helpdesk@spocsa.co.za

Cape Town Branch
Telephone: 086 110 6012

When logging your ticket with our helpdesk, please include the international number you are trying to dial.

Yes, we can setup a VoIP Call Forward service for your company allowing your number to be forwarded to another telephonic number. Kindly contact us for assistance in setting up the call forwarding option on your VoIP package and we will gladly assist you. Please note however, there are additional charges involved when forwarding calls to a different number.

Kindly provide us with the following information in order for us to assist you:

  • Your account number;
  • The telephone number to be forwarded:
  • The telephone number to be forwarded to.

You can contact us on the following details:
Head office (Gauteng) HelpDesk
Telephone: 086 111 2802

Email: helpdesk@spocsa.co.za

Cape Town Branch
Telephone: 086 110 6012

Number porting is a feature in which your existing telephone number can be moved to another telecom provider and the number remains the same. 

Kindly contact us to assist you with the number porting:
Head office (Gauteng) HelpDesk
Telephone: 086 111 2802

Email: helpdesk@spocsa.co.za

Cape Town Branch
Telephone: 086 110 6012

Currently only Geographic numbers (e.g. 011, 012, 021, 031, etc. ) can be ported to other telecoms including SPOC Managed Services. South African number porting regulations does not support the porting of non-geographic numbers (e.g. 087) between operators.

Quality of Service (QoS) in the VoIP environment refers to the priority of Voice over an Internet or Data line.

If a subscriber is using an Internet line with no priority for Voice, factors such as browsing the internet, or receiving an email will affect the throughput, and therefore Voice Quality. Remember, Voice is a real-time application, and therefore needs to be given priority over all other traffic. Quality of Service is not only affected on the Subscribers side by having a Router that supports SIP Quality of Service (QoS), but this QoS needs to be recognised, managed and controlled by SPOC.

There is a multitude of last-mile connections on the market and the ideal is to either go with a direct 1:1 connection such a link provided by SPOC that is Managed, Controlled and Optimised for VoIP connectivity (i.e. Leased Line, Microwave, etc) or with a High-Speed Broadband service that stays off the Public Internet, otherwise this would be subjected to a best-effort Quality of Service policy.

If you are experiencing bad call quality either incoming or outgoing we are able to assist you and send out one of our qualified technicians to rectify the issues you are experiencing. Kindly contact our HelpDesk and provide full information on the errors you are experiencing and we will assist accordingly.

Head office (Gauteng) HelpDesk
Telephone: 086 111 2802

Email: helpdesk@spocsa.co.za

Cape Town Branch
Telephone: 086 110 6012

Cloud Hosting PBX

Cloud Based PBX: PABX and data is hosted in our server room at a datacenter. The systems are provided to you as an off-site hosted service. Therefore, your risk of Lightning and Load-shedding damages is reduced. As the system is cloud based it can be accessed from any secure internet source which creates mobility in your business. 

On-Premise PBXYour telecom systems and data are located at your office. 

CONTACT US

Head Office Gauteng

Telephone: +27 12 643 9940
Share Call: 086 111 2802
Email: info@spocsa.co.za

Address:
1249 Embankment Road
Inkwazi Office Park, Block E,
Centurion, Gauteng
0157

Cape Town Tygervalley

Telephone: +27 21 915 5600
Share Call: 086 110 6012
Email: info@spocsa.co.za

Address:
3 Pasita Street,
7b Sunbird Office Park,

Tygervalley,
7530